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.org. >>> next on book tv, ro khana secretary of commerce argues that the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in manufacturing and innovation. it's about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for that kind introduction. it is an honor to be at politics and prose, such an institution to the city and really a pleasure to be here. thank you for everyone coming out on this august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments, and i rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective so that we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to become competitive. the idea for the book came about when i was traveling around the country. i would go and see a successful manufacturer making lenders, making steel, making fire suits making meat and food, and i would say you know, i thought all of our manufacturing had gone offshore. something doesn't make sense. and so i started to wonder what were people missing in the story if. and it turns out that one allele of consumer manufacturing has gone offshore so if you go into a store, but
of commerce argues that the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in manufacturing and innovation. it's about 45 minutes. >> thank you for the kind introduction. it is an honor to be yet politics and prose, such an institution to the city and a pleasure to be here. thank you everyone for coming on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments and i would rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective so we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to be competitive. the idea from the book came about when i was traveling and around the country, and i would see a successful manufacturer making blunders and steel and full-year suits and meat and food, and i would say i thought that all of our manufacturing had gone offshore. something didn't make sense. so i started to wonder what were people missing in the story? and it turns out that while a lot of manufacturing has gone offshore, so if you go into a store, the toys and apparel and all of that we still are a world leader when it comes to complex and advanced man
>> next and booktv ro khanna legal assistant deputy -- dubya secretary of commerce argues the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in at manufacturing and innovation. it is about 45 minutes. >> thank you. thank you for the very kind introduction. a real honor to be at politics and prose. such an institution to the city and the pleasure to be here. thank you for coming out on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments and i have more of an exchange of ideas and your perspective so i can have a conversation about manufacturing and what the country should do to be competitive. the idea for the book came about when i was traveling around the country and i would see a successful manufacturer making lenders, making steel, making meat and food and i would say i thought our manufacturing had gone off shore. something didn't make sense. i started to wonder what were people missing in the story and it turns out that while a lot of consumer manufacturing has gone off shore or if you go into a store, the toys and apparel, a lot of that has left america, we are s
dealt with the commerce clause issue yes, five of them including john roberts said it exceeds the bet exceeds the power because it is so unusual. in other words they didn't cast down a month to meet the among the president's. they gave congress the power under the understanding of the commerce clause so there is a sense in which it me be one of to the of the calls could be more important but we just don't know. we will have to see. so, my time is up and i am really sorry that i had to do my signing before because i had to catch a plane so i won't see you at the signing table but thank you very much for coming. [applause] said that even a part of the 2011 national book festival here in washington, d.c.. to find out more, visit loc.gov/bookfest. jeffrey to the reports on the relationship which in the obama administration and the u.s. supreme court. the author exam of the recent addition of the four justices in the past five years and how it has affected the court's decisions on the numerous cases including its recent ruling on health care. it's about an hour. [applause] thank you. hello
without the koreans. it is been a beautiful thing to see. and i am intrigued at how commerce brings people together. a very beautiful way without central planning. i can tell you, koreans have nothing in common. culturally in any other way. we love each other. it's a beautiful thing to see how, sprays people together. beautiful. >> what is? >> founded in 1972 back in the analog age when people just read paper and ink and got their work to the milk. you don't remember these days. i vaguely. and it was very prosperous. it was a kind of us source for libertarian ideas back in the old days. bump up against the digital age, 1995. it began to have problems and never became profitable again. in 2010, the way you acquire an old mansion that was falling down something. help of refurbishing it. very honored to be picked to become executive editor and hope that i could turn a profit. >> what kind of books he published? >> leslie history and philosophy and economics and financial books. and we're doing more publishing now. this is how i started in november. back now, it's everywhere. never were you gu
am intrigued help commerce brains people together a bout central planning. coulter lake three hands have nothing in common but the brotherhood of man is beautiful. >> host: what is laissez-faire books? >> founded back in the analog age can you imagine? i vaguely remember these days it was the economists source for libertarian ideas in 1995 they began to have problems and never became profitable again was like acquiring the old so i was very honored to be picked for the executive better in the hope to turn it around we publish history and philosophy and we're doing more publishing now. is everywhere. and i started a digital ballclub just like the old fashioned book club only in the digital world. [laughter] in has only been around six weeks but it is of a wonderful thing to be part of a commercial endeavor. you make a plan that it can change i don't know all the answers but maybe there will present themselves. it is a creative endeavor. it is from the balance it is beautiful see you could go to bet at night i did the right thing that i will try again tomorrow. >> what is the ludwig v
they might get busted for their garden. now they have the chamber of commerce and a sheriff's permit -- they have bracelets and necklaces of one all their plans. it was an unmitigated success. now, you will notice this slightly sad story. visit to a program works. heading into the mendocino county area, i am a renter myself. i haven't had have the hat and the broken down truck and the beard and i am an organic hemp proponent, we buy only organic hemp diapers. for sale out here in the lobby. we tie our tomato plants with hemp twine because it holds of the best. but we have to get -- it's growing 20% per year. hemp is such a good fiber, it is in the dodge viper numbers and doors. i couldn't believe it. i called and they said yes, we do use cannabis. this is not squeezing the oil from that permits a perfect oil. what i want is a solution to this. i want to see if i'm getting this right. one of the directors here and one of the founders to get navy or army surplus have, a deal something in the 70s? smacked it was a coalition. we specialize in clothing and help develop it. it was romanian
, and some of these things such as the chamber of commerce boosters and some of it was about land planning. some of it was about race and poverty. but it was a conversation that americans were starting to have as they could see the signals that things were not going quite right for america. this was the 1970s. the energy crisis staring us in the face. and this is not just among the grassroots there were big businesspeople. i have quotes in the book saying you know this is commonsense. we need to plan our future. when reagan was elected, rip the solar panels out of the white house and more importantly, photoshop the future out of our future. it was not -- the future was not going to be shaped by government. it was going to be determined by the market. and that mindset you know has been reinforced in the echo chamber of our politics. so people are confused about that, but they also don't understand or understand is the wrong word. they also don't see the importance of working together collectively. you see when the show whole show is the country is going to hell but i'm going to be okay it t
wrote that he was going to be a chamber of commerce day, flies buzzed lazily of the gumbo and green and blue spring. i can hear the rhythmic of a few cicadas the first of the year coming up from the riverside. that's the rio grande. the wish of cars and trucks up and down the highway, the distant adding of locals taking target practice in the blm highway. we are surrounded and millions of acres of public land that once belonged to the ancestors of my neighbors. and suddenly, go to that little punta of yours. the shriek usually happens in the final word of a phrase like life, taking the and bending at several different directions before her breath runs out amid she coughs. she coughs a lot. i hear it early in the morning, late at night. i hear very clearly when she's sitting on the patio smoking a joint. it is big and sharp, tissue creating deep inside her chest. every once in a while he was on, but he never shouts as lovely as she does. look at you, you're seko. they are dealing. we've noticed the traffic. perhaps a dozen cars at a drive-through. these customers are men, all this sp
valley. the local weather forecast growth that was going to be a chamber of commerce to. flies in the yellow green for spring. i can hear the rhythmic whir of a few cicadas. first of the year coming up from the riverside. that's the reason joe grand. the car sentra up-and-down taking target this across the highway. we are surrounded by millions of acres of land that once belonged to the ancestors of my neighbors. and suddenly, her voice builds encrusting shriek, which usually happens on the final word of the phrase like life, taken the vow and bending at several different directions before her breath rundown, then she coughs. she coughs a lot. as your early in the morning, late at night. you're clearly when she's sitting on the patio smoking a joint. the throat clenching and tissue creating deep inside her chest. everyone's been a while, he responds, but he never shows as loudly as she does. look at you, you're psycho. they are dealing. we have noticed the traffic. perhaps a dozen cars a day trip through. these customers are men, i'll expand on his as mexican-americans can't th
else going on.. everybody talked out the hurricane still and the chamber of commerce.er f you learn more spending a day n and taking the tour and you seee all of this residue which remains. if you spend a lot of time onhe the ground and learn much from r being there if galveston is unusual or unique, then theane. impact is this an francisco with the earthquake or even southlseg florida. miss degette was not a defining event because so much also stolen. he was eclipsed and destroyed soan much of the city there bysped beating houston to the north this competition. i spent a fair amount of time.r i looked down at least six times g lot of research in the library there. who has been to galveston? on event to galveston expecting something like charleston. li t what i was surprised that isuse when you go there in the heart c of the city today you can't get september 8th because somethinga fundamental changed. after the storm city built the daise sea level and then elevated thed entire city anywhere from 8 feet to 2 feet and raised thes mis cathedral if you can imaginetild that the whole ci
never was although he gave his vote on the commerce clause to the other for conservatives, but i always thought he would be the decider. this would indicate that he's kind of changing his tune of attacking more to the metal. this term will tell because unlike the health care case, this coming term that has affirmative action and almost certainly voting rights took the big great subjects and rate has been his subject just like federalism was kennedy. roberts is entering his eighth term as the chief justice, so, early in his tenure in the case in 2007 where he said the way to stop discriminating by race is to stop discriminating by race he says as in validating an effort by the systems to keep public schools from resegregate in. he's eager to get into the subjects. what i expect attacking to the metal on those i don't think so but i'm not 100% sure it is the question of the moment. this is where the roberts court is about to meet the road there is a decision to be made between what a judge believes, and he deeply believes it is wrong for the government to classify or count people by race
in the past because they were afraid that they might get busted for their garden. nokia chamber of commerce, have a sheriffs permit, they have bracelets and necklaces on all their plants. it was an unmitigated success. you will notice past tense, andrew get into slightly unhelpfully -- by zip-tie program work. heading into mendocino county, it's quite possible that it didn't so much become native -- i'm a rancher of myself but not cannabis ranch. i make good rant you. i have a broken down truck, i have the beard and i fit right in. hemp and cannabis were already in my families like the only organic hemp, diapers. the soap for sale out here in the lobby. we tie our tomato plants with hemp twine because it holds up the best. we have to get from roaming. the hemp market is growing. it's in the dodge viper romper and was but i couldn't believe it. i call to pick up they said that, we used cannabis in the dodge viper because it works and it's good. what i really want to see is fill 'er up with hemp. this is not using hemp seed oil. i added to my family shake everyone. non-psychoactive. it's not
of these things were just chamber of commerce boosters. some of it was above land planning. silva was about race and poverty , but it was a conversation that americans are starting to have as they can see the signals that things were not going quite right. this is the 1970's. energy crisis. staring us in the face. and this is not just among the grass roots left. big business people. this is just common sense. many to plan our future. when reagan was elected, the solar panels ripped of the white house. more importantly, photo showed the future out of -- was not going to be -- the future was not calling to be shipped by government, it was going to be determined by the market. that mind-set has been reinforced in reinforced in the echo chamber of our politics. so people are confused about that. they also don't understand. the doe and as -- they also don't see the importance of working together collectively. see, when the polls show was that the country is going to hell, but i'm going to be okay it tells you there's a disconnect. the connection was made by the new deal between the future, the collec
night the local weather forecaster wrote to it would be a chamber of commerce day and i could hear the cicadas coming up from the riverside those states gain target practice and we're surrounded by millions of acres of publicly and that once belonged to ancestors of my neighbors. and suddenly heard oasis builds the ball bad then sit and several different directions. vichy will call off. all lot. i hear that night when she sits on the patio it is quick and sharp everyone's in awhile he responds but he never shouts adds law of the. look at you. you are psycho. they are dealing. we notice the traffic seven cars per day. the customers are men young and old mostly in the work truck some come early some to raise rates job but there's clearly after finishing work and some in the middle of the day. and it just so happens there prominent in the area. one member of the klan owns a nightclub i am told our old connected family. they passed on the advice of local law enforcement after she suspected he stole the lawn mower. >> we cannot do anything but if you want to take action issue to drag h
's the same debate. you talk about the commerce clause. you talk about geek show protection and due process, substantive due process. it's all the same debate, and it is an appropriate debate. and it's one that i would wish what sort of tried to reach the same high level that we saw in philadelphia. and that we are going to see at other points in the ratification who writes like this sort of defenses and arguments that you see in the federalist? who sits at home and draft arguments and letters at you saw mason. he didn't have a staff drafting. these were people who were engaged in the constitution and i also wanted to know these were not scholars. these were not people that appropriated to themselves the sole licensed to interpret or to talk about this great document. these were farmers. these were businessmen. some of them who had formal education and some who did not. that they cared about this country and i think we still have it today. and you know i think that again, go back to your book. you talk about the written and the unwritten constitution. wealthy and written constitution is rea
to be for political purposes. a lot of what we're trying to do is increase commerce between the united states and other countries. part of what we're trying to do is debunk myths about the united states, increase tourism in the united states. so a lot of this is not all about politics per se. in terms of who we're reaching, you know, there are now over five billion mobile handsets on planet earth. the average mobile penetration in developed countries is now about 316% -- 116%, in developing countries it's about 70 or 80%. most of those people are using those handsets to access social media platforms where the state department publishes. so we're reaching large numbers of individuals the world around. there are about 2.4 sort of traditional internet users, and that number's going to be three billion in the near future, so, sure, we're communicating with all of -- with a great many of those. but what's also interesting to us is thinking about this great development perspective and thinking about how if, for example, sub-saharan africa or south central asia are becoming newly hyperconnected, how
budgets of the departments of commerce, education, energy, homeland security, interior, justice, state, plus the federal courts. so how is it that we're able to borrow so much money and pay so little interest on it? why aren't we like spain or italy or greece? if sorting out because we will manage our finances, or that we have a political system that seems to be a marvel of efficiency of compromise and comedy. it's because the rest of the world looks even worse. the united states is the world's tallest midget when it comes to borrowing money. if this could go on for ever, it would be fantastic. it is not going to go on forever. i have no clue when it's going to in but it's not going to go on forever. as interest rates return to normal, the share of the federal budget that goes to interest is going to rise. and that will crowd that spending on other things. it means they will pay taxes and will borrow money and some of the money would borrow will go to pay interest on the money we borrowed flashy. some of taxes we pay will go to pay interest to our creditors. and those creditors are inc
in 1783. once the cities get to be a certain density and there's enough commerce and population, then in the early part of the 19th century they get going and they really take off in 1830s. >> so that's when it's fair to say for the first time that journalism is a business? >> yes. it's clear by then. yeah. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org.
at it than there. you think of three kinds of broadly speaking, look at cyberattacks, free commerce. one is to try for you to try to take down networks, whether it's a communications network, for example, take down, shut down your to mutations, financial or something. the other two ways depend on the networks working. one is to use your communications networks to launch an attack against another network ideological grid. so use it as a point. and a third is to use it for content, and this is where the islamists have considerable confidence in radicalizing people over the internet with radical oriented islamic content. so we have an edge in the first two areas. we have the us and the israelis. most skilled people elsewhere on this, probably by governments behind russia and china are very good at that stuff. and that will come into any confrontation we have with them. content, they are more skilled at using than we are but we should certainly use whatever weapons we can. >> thank you, john. that's give john a hand. [applause] >> we would like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitt
was not like the department of commerce with people under him, but it was a small staff, and that was a good thing. he accumulated power through the friendships in congress with democrats and with republicans and i think it's special pert innocent now with the recent passage of the three bills last night, the trade bills with colombia, panama, and south korea. everyone's making such a big deal about, you know, how they got them through quickly and how bipartisan they were, and it's true, but this bill was also devicive, and it was not just three countries bob was negotiating with, but 102. this was one of the really large rounds of trade, and so i wanted to read a little bit about how bob negotiated through congress. at the part in the -- the bill end up passing 305 #-7 # # in the house and 90-4 in the senate, and after the house vote came in, bob said to stu, a domestic policy adviser. stu, who are the seven sons of bitches who voted against my bill? [laughter] he got the victory. there was a controversial bill, a devicive bill, and he still got the 395-7 vote and 90-4 vote. at this point,
about the commerce clause and equal protection to process, the first amendment to read it all the same debate and it's an appropriate debate and it's one that i wish we would reach the same high level but we saw in philadelphia and at other points in the ratification process, who we see in the federalist today. who sits at home and troughs the arguments that you see, letters? you have a staff of drafting these things. these are people that are engaged. you knew the constitution. these are not scholars. these were not people that appropriated to themselves to interpret what to talk about. these performers, these are business people. some of them had formal education and some did not but they cared about this country. i go back to your book can't you talk about the written and unwritten constitution. it's really what we do. it's the sort of trying to bring to apply the evin send problems and cases and develop them and that debate continues on each one of those, and that's why. that's why the arguments are. that's why the scholarship is. one thing i like about the tone of your book is its
, information, in what direction and it continues. it is this same debate. you can talk about the commerce clause and equal protection of due process. it is all the same debate and it is an appropriate debate and hit is one that i would wish would sort of try to reach the same high-level that we saw in philadelphia that we are going to see at other points in the ratification process. sort of defense and arguments. who sits at home and drafts arguments that you see letters? you don't have a staff do these things. these are people who were engaged and also -- these were not scholars. these were not people who appropriated to themselves licenses to interpret or talk about this. these were foreigners. some of them who had formal education and some did not but they cared about this country. i think that i go back to your point. you talk about the written and the unwritten constitution. the unwritten constitution is sort of trying to to bring current events and problems and development and that debate continues on each one of them and that is why you see different points. that is why arguments -
is the hub of international media and commerce. in his blighted neighborhood he hates the south like east berlin hated west berlin. they haven of entrepreneurialism have always outperformed the statist neighbors south korea over north korea. hong kong and taiwan. this is a universal truth the south of fills the same role today with the prosperity exposed the impoverished lies and deceit. that is why liberals hate the south. [applause] because they believe the environment of hillbillies have defeated them. they can barely stand it. and it lies with though 17 virtue in the end even the liberal haccp have the place to live or work driving and nail in the dream because as he picked -- packs of this stuff soon you'll hear the words that will drive a dagger into his hopes. how the neighbor. [laughter] , everybody gets the trophy. [laughter] . . about high school graduations and the issue of valedictorians. the -- the torian initio? did they go on a crime sprain alcohol binge? and it turns out i used bunch of schools in america think that by having just one of the the the torian is mean spirited
agree on the idea of a serious commerce asian centered on this document. since i mentioned amendments, i don't make too many predictions but i will say that most of the amendments, as a practical matter, have the support of both parties because it's hard to get two-thirds, two-thirds-3/4 without both parties being on board. the great amendments of the 1960's for example, the great iconic statutes of the 1960's and the civil rights acts of civic -- civil rights act of 64 and the voting rights act of 65 in a fair housing act of 68. republicans and democrats in the spirit that you're calling for and one of her thought since we are talking about our sponsoring institutions for this really extraordinary conversation, and that is the national archives. i think that the framers of the constitution who would amending their regime, they studied the state constitution and they saw which ones work and didn't. massachusetts put his concentration to a vote so let's put our constitution to a vote. most of the constitutions have three branches of government. let's go at that. most of them have bicamera
to commerce and trade and later, of course, would sponsor the federal highway system, at that time the largest public works project in american history. eisenhower was a military man, but he was not militaristic. >>> this is, that he did in not think war was a solution to anything. he was, as one aide recalled, slow to pick up the sword. ike's public persona, that grandfatherly man with a big smile and a love of golf was largely ike's personal invention. behind the scenes, he was strategically rigorous and a tough-minded commander in chief. the people who worked for him never doubted who was in charge. eisenhower was a citizen of the world more than any other president. yet he never forgot where he came from, that's why his presidential library is in abilene, kansas, close to where i live. ike was not a professional politician, yet he was one of the most successful politicians in our history, and supremely protective of his hero's image. ike did not hesitate to use subordinates like john foster dulles as lightning rods for controversial policies that were, in fact, ike's creation. eisenhower w
to london. that's why atlanta, georgia, is a hub of commerce. the american liberal isn't -- and his blighted neighborhood looks upon all of this. he hates the south like an east berliner hated west berlin. throughout the were with seen this time and time again. havens of entrepreneurialism and individual liberty have always outperformed the statist neighbors. whether it was west germany leaping over east germany, hong kong and taiwan putting china to shame, or singapore outshining impoverish malaysia. this has been universal truth of history. the south fulfills that same role today. that's why liberals hate the south. [applause] liberals hate the south because what they believe is an assignment of ignorance has defeated them in affluence and sophistication. they can barely stand it, but there is so. and it lies in a once in virtue i've yet to mention because much as bill of rights the south, in in even a little has to find a place to live and work and that's where southern hospitality drives the final minute into the dream. because if the liver packs up and leaves, he knows with dread and so
. lawrence a way to open up the center of the country to commerce and trade and later of course the federal highway system, that times the largest public works project in american history. eisenhower was a military man but he was not relativistic. bat as he did not think that war was often a solution to anything. he was what one would call slow to pick up the sword. ike's public persona to grandfather the man with a big smile was largely ike's personal invention. behind the scenes he was strategically vigorous and a tough-minded commander in chief. the people who worked work for him never doubted who was in charge. eisenhower was -- more than any other person. he never had forgotten where he came from and that is why his presidential library is in abilene kansas, close to where i live. ike was not a professional politician that he was one of the most successful politicians in our history and supremely protective of his image. ike did not hesitate to use support like secretary of state john foster dulles as lightning rods for controversial politics that were in fact his creation. eisenhower
, ideology and commerce. walter is one of those people that moves easily from history to politics to miscommunication and there is a reason why. he's been the editor of "time" magazine, the chairman and cnn, the chairman of the broadcasting board of governors, the chairman of teach for america. somewhere along the way he began to turn his voracious appetite for a good story to making stories of the zone. steve jobs, his latest book is a deeply absorbing exploration of the might and personality of the founder and chief of apple incorporated. given the story to hear from steve jobs himself to write an authorized biography, someone else might have turned the book into a puff piece, heavy on accomplishment and light on flaw. but his book is anything but that. it is a full-scale portrait of a fascinating america. it's the story of a boy that started a vision in his garage with a friend from down the street turned into a worldwide phenomenon. the president of the "washington post" said yesterday walter isaacson's book is yet another perfectly designed product by steve jobs, for he knew
it is the makes not a great leader of nations but of science, ideology and commerce. moving to history and politics and communication. the chairmen and ceo of cnn and somewhere along the way he turned his appetite into making stories of his own. his latest book is an exploration of life and personality of the founder and chief of apple. to hear from someone else may have turned the book into a puff piece with have the on accomplishment and light on flaws but it is a full-scale war it and all portrait. the story of the boy who started the vision into a worldwide phenomenon. somebody said yesterday his book is another perfectly designed product by steve jobs. he knew for a booktv any good it would have to be written by a veteran. he chose the right man. i'd like to introduce an american with the deep appreciation for history. babies and gentlemen, walter isaacson. [applause] they call of the wall. about eight years ago i got a phone call from steve jobs knowing him for when he came to time magazine and to show off the macintosh. even then i saw the passion for perfection and how those wo
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)